Discussion:
Wha' saw the Tattie Howkers ?
(too old to reply)
d***@gmail.com
2015-01-03 01:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Anyone have the words of this song ?
Can't find it anywhere on-line.
-- The Despicable Stewart
-- Perfidious Alban
-- http://www.ian.stewart.ukgateway.net/informer.htm
From Roy to Elaine Goldberg...
In the early 1930's my Grannie sang this song to me ( a six-year old or so!
).
However the first verse ended thus -
'Wha saw the tattie howkers sailin' doon the Broomielaw' !
My Grandmother told me that the song referred to casual Irish workers who took temporary work, harvesting the potato crop in the West of Scotland. They would then be paid a paltry wage, and I dare say would be glad to. They would sail back to Belfast or other Irish port at the end of the harvesting.
As a youngster in the 1930's Clackmannanshire countryside, we thought it a privilege to help with harvesting, and welcomed a two-penny bottle of Orange Crush or Irn Brew, as recompense for our efforts. Facts from an exiled Scot in Vemont !!.
soup
2015-01-08 13:25:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by d***@gmail.com
Anyone have the words of this song ?
However the first verse ended thus -
'Wha saw the tattie howkers sailin' doon the Broomielaw' !
Should it not be "gangin' doon the broomilaw". Always thought it
applied to itinerant workers mainly from Scotland not Ireland and the
Broomielaw is a road in Newcastle. Mind you I suppose it is like
stovies, minestrone, the ball of Kirriemuir etc in that there are as
many different versions as people who sing it(cook it).
soupdragon
2015-01-09 20:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by soup
Post by d***@gmail.com
Anyone have the words of this song ?
However the first verse ended thus -
'Wha saw the tattie howkers sailin' doon the Broomielaw' !
Should it not be "gangin' doon the broomilaw". Always thought it
applied to itinerant workers mainly from Scotland not Ireland and the
Broomielaw is a road in Newcastle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broomielaw

Photo here -

http://www.glasgowhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Lancelot-and-
Sultana-at-the-Broomielaw-1.jpg
Joe Makowiec
2015-01-10 00:22:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by soupdragon
Photo here -
http://www.glasgowhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Lancelot-and-
Sultana-at-the-Broomielaw-1.jpg
Great pic - thanks!
--
Joe Makowiec
http://makowiec.org/
Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
soupdragon
2015-01-10 19:07:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Makowiec
Post by soupdragon
Photo here -
http://www.glasgowhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Lancelot-and-
Sultana-at-the-Broomielaw-1.jpg
Great pic - thanks!
More here frae the Broomielaw

http://tinyurl.com/ndvhbfo
JeffreyHamilton
2015-01-21 23:56:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by soupdragon
Post by soup
On Tuesday, 4 February 2003 04:20:56 UTC-5,
Anyone have the words of this song ?
However the first verse ended thus -
'Wha saw the tattie howkers sailin' doon the Broomielaw' !
Should it not be "gangin' doon the broomilaw". Always thought it
applied to itinerant workers mainly from Scotland not Ireland and the
Broomielaw is a road in Newcastle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broomielaw
Photo here -
http://www.glasgowhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Lancelot-and-
Sultana-at-the-Broomielaw-1.jpg
Those are really unusual looking boats, what would normally be their cargo,
@soupdragon ?

cheers....Jeff
JeffreyHamilton
2015-01-22 00:12:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JeffreyHamilton
Post by soupdragon
Post by soup
On Tuesday, 4 February 2003 04:20:56 UTC-5,
Anyone have the words of this song ?
However the first verse ended thus -
'Wha saw the tattie howkers sailin' doon the Broomielaw' !
Should it not be "gangin' doon the broomilaw". Always thought it
applied to itinerant workers mainly from Scotland not Ireland and
the Broomielaw is a road in Newcastle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broomielaw
Photo here -
http://www.glasgowhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Lancelot-and-
Sultana-at-the-Broomielaw-1.jpg
Those are really unusual looking boats, what would normally be their
cheers....Jeff
Ok, looking at the other page that you posted I found this photo and
discovered that they are known as paddle tug's.
Now the shape makes sense, to me....
Loading Image...

cheers....Jeff
g***@gmail.com
2017-04-12 19:00:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Bits and stockings. Bits meaning boots.

Loading...