Discussion:
Burns Nicht
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James Silverton
2015-03-14 19:14:41 UTC
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Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?

Here's a picture:
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm

It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Alan Smaill
2015-03-14 20:01:57 UTC
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Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
--
Alan Smaill
S Viemeister
2015-03-14 23:35:53 UTC
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Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Too much work for too little reward.
soupdragon
2015-03-15 13:00:25 UTC
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Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Never mind that. Bring it up to date and bring on the pizza crunch.
James Silverton
2015-03-15 13:39:21 UTC
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Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Crabs are pretty good but Burns did not mention them either. Oh, I
thought I had found "partan" but it was in "Spartan" and, believe it or not:

Ode For General Washington's Birthday

No Spartan tube, no Attic shell,
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Alan Smaill
2015-03-15 13:44:11 UTC
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Post by James Silverton
Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Crabs are pretty good but Burns did not mention them either.
Nor tatties, AFAIK.
Post by James Silverton
Oh, I
Ode For General Washington's Birthday
No Spartan tube, no Attic shell,
he fair got around.
--
Alan Smaill
The Other Guy
2015-03-15 17:49:47 UTC
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On Sun, 15 Mar 2015 09:39:21 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Crabs are pretty good but Burns did not mention them either. Oh, I
Ode For General Washington's Birthday
No Spartan tube, no Attic shell,
http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2014/11/a-bill-of-fare-for-st-andrews-day-1828.html






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The Other Guy
2015-03-15 17:51:37 UTC
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On Sun, 15 Mar 2015 09:39:21 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Alan Smaill
Post by James Silverton
Did you go to a Burns supper this year? If so, were you served mashed
neeps (Rutabagas or Swedes) with your haggis?
http://britishfood.about.com/od/menu/r/burnssupper.htm
It is strange that Burns nowhere mentions neeps or turnips in his poetry.
Bring back the buttered partans for Burns supper!
Crabs are pretty good but Burns did not mention them either. Oh, I
Ode For General Washington's Birthday
No Spartan tube, no Attic shell,
http://www.scotlandinaweek.com/traditional-scottish-food.html

Buttered Partans ~ Small Pastry ~ Stewed Onions

Partans are edible crabs, one of the few words that came into Scots (I
mean into the northern form of ‘English’ that we speak) from Gaelic. We’d
certainly use the word at home. Seafood is a growing component in modern
Scots cuisine and widely available – for example, scallops (pictured
above), plus what we would have called ‘pra’ans (prawns) sometimes
referred to as Norway lobster (Nephrops) or (if posh) langoustines. And
lots more. I’m getting really hungry writing this.




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Fred J. McCall
2015-03-15 20:57:38 UTC
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Post by The Other Guy
Buttered Partans ~ Small Pastry ~ Stewed Onions
Partans are edible crabs, one of the few words that came into Scots (I
mean into the northern form of ‘English’ that we speak) from Gaelic. We’d
certainly use the word at home. Seafood is a growing component in modern
Scots cuisine and widely available – for example, scallops (pictured
above), plus what we would have called ‘pra’ans (prawns) sometimes
referred to as Norway lobster (Nephrops) or (if posh) langoustines. And
lots more. I’m getting really hungry writing this.
Wasn't seafood historically a big part of at least some Scots' diets?
I thought coastal Scots did a fair amount of fishing and traveling in
small boats...
--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
S Viemeister
2015-03-15 21:52:37 UTC
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Post by Fred J. McCall
Post by The Other Guy
Buttered Partans ~ Small Pastry ~ Stewed Onions
Partans are edible crabs, one of the few words that came into Scots (I
mean into the northern form of ‘English’ that we speak) from Gaelic. We’d
certainly use the word at home. Seafood is a growing component in modern
Scots cuisine and widely available – for example, scallops (pictured
above), plus what we would have called ‘pra’ans (prawns) sometimes
referred to as Norway lobster (Nephrops) or (if posh) langoustines. And
lots more. I’m getting really hungry writing this.
Wasn't seafood historically a big part of at least some Scots' diets?
I thought coastal Scots did a fair amount of fishing and traveling in
small boats...
Until fairly recently there was an enormous deposit (prehistoric) of
seashells a mile or two down the road from my house - cockles,
razorfish, all sorts. Boats weren't necessary for those, just a rake and
a bucket or basket, at low tide.
Alan Smaill
2015-03-15 21:56:26 UTC
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Post by Fred J. McCall
Post by The Other Guy
Buttered Partans ~ Small Pastry ~ Stewed Onions
Partans are edible crabs, one of the few words that came into Scots (I
mean into the northern form of ‘English’ that we speak) from Gaelic. We’d
certainly use the word at home. Seafood is a growing component in modern
Scots cuisine and widely available – for example, scallops (pictured
above), plus what we would have called ‘pra’ans (prawns) sometimes
referred to as Norway lobster (Nephrops) or (if posh) langoustines. And
lots more. I’m getting really hungry writing this.
Wasn't seafood historically a big part of at least some Scots' diets?
I thought coastal Scots did a fair amount of fishing and traveling in
small boats...
"Musselburgh" is a bit of a giveaway --

19th photos of street sellers of fish/oyster/mussel in Edinburgh:

http://people.ace.ed.ac.uk/students/s1109419/dmspsite/characters.html

pollution did for the local oyster beds in the Forth, which
seem to have been a food source for thousands of years, judging
by shell middens around the firth.

Pollution is less of a problem these days, but apparently native oysters
are an endangered species:

http://www.forthestuaryforum.co.uk/assets/pdf/forthsight/forthsight%20no19.pdf
--
Alan Smaill
g***@gmail.com
2015-03-15 22:35:01 UTC
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Post by Fred J. McCall
Post by The Other Guy
Buttered Partans ~ Small Pastry ~ Stewed Onions
Partans are edible crabs, one of the few words that came into Scots (I
mean into the northern form of 'English' that we speak) from Gaelic. We'd
certainly use the word at home. Seafood is a growing component in modern
Scots cuisine and widely available - for example, scallops (pictured
above), plus what we would have called 'pra'ans (prawns) sometimes
referred to as Norway lobster (Nephrops) or (if posh) langoustines. And
lots more. I'm getting really hungry writing this.
Wasn't seafood historically a big part of at least some Scots' diets?
I thought coastal Scots did a fair amount of fishing and traveling in
small boats...
--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
Fin I wis a loon, we had parridge, herrings in oatmeal, eggs scones,kippers,Skirley, Stovies, neeps,tatties, mealy puddings.

Also this stuffing a turkey or chicken with breadcrumbs is an English thing. We stuffed with Skirley.
Fifeshire Floozie
2015-03-16 04:06:54 UTC
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 6:35:02 PM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:
<SNIP>
Post by g***@gmail.com
Fin I wis a loon,
I ye no aye a loon?
Post by g***@gmail.com
we had parridge, herrings in oatmeal, eggs scones,kippers,Skirley, Stovies, neeps,tatties, mealy puddings.
Also this stuffing a turkey or chicken with breadcrumbs is an English thing. We stuffed with Skirley.
Skirley! Fur a meenit Ah thocht ye wis a cannibal> Shirley ye mean "skirlie" :)

Cheers, Helen
g***@gmail.com
2015-03-16 16:30:04 UTC
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Post by Fifeshire Floozie
<SNIP>
Post by g***@gmail.com
Fin I wis a loon,
I ye no aye a loon?
Post by g***@gmail.com
we had parridge, herrings in oatmeal, eggs scones,kippers,Skirley, Stovies, neeps,tatties, mealy puddings.
Also this stuffing a turkey or chicken with breadcrumbs is an English thing. We stuffed with Skirley.
Skirley! Fur a meenit Ah thocht ye wis a cannibal> Shirley ye mean "skirlie" :)
Cheers, Helen
I think you can spell it either way

http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/skirley-30878-recipe.htm
Fifeshire Floozie
2015-03-17 00:43:35 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by g***@gmail.com
Also this stuffing a turkey or chicken with breadcrumbs is an English
thing. We stuffed with Skirley.
Skirley! Fur a meenit Ah thocht ye wis a cannibal> Shirley ye mean "skirlie" :)
I think you can spell it either way
http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/skirley-30878-recipe.htm
I've never seen it spelled like that.
g***@gmail.com
2015-03-17 00:52:08 UTC
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Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by g***@gmail.com
Also this stuffing a turkey or chicken with breadcrumbs is an English
thing. We stuffed with Skirley.
Skirley! Fur a meenit Ah thocht ye wis a cannibal> Shirley ye mean "skirlie" :)
I think you can spell it either way
http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/skirley-30878-recipe.htm
I've never seen it spelled like that.
well it doesn't really matter, these are Scots words and you can make up the spelling I suppose. Anyway, how are you doing? Like me, still not deed.
Fifeshire Floozie
2015-03-17 20:09:50 UTC
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Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Skirley! Fur a meenit Ah thocht ye wis a cannibal> Shirley ye mean "skirlie" :)
I think you can spell it either way
http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/skirley-30878-recipe.htm
I've never seen it spelled like that.
well it doesn't really matter, these are Scots words and you can make up the >spelling I suppose. Anyway, how are you doing? Like me, still not deed.
Aye! Spellin phonetically's aw richt! Ah'm daein brawly. Ah'm gled tae see yer no deid! Wha wuild we hae tae pick oan? :)
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