Discussion:
Even cheaper flights to Canada
(too old to reply)
Kevn McM
2003-11-07 14:49:20 UTC
Permalink
I'm determined to win a prize in the November competition :) I can only hope
that Ian is putting a copy of 'The West Highland Way in all Seasons' by
I.C.A.N. Post on the prize list.

A TOUR operator has sparked a flights price war by launching direct services
from Glasgow to Toronto for £69 one way.
Canadian Affair, based in Glasgow since 1999, plans to go head-to-head with
Scots firm Zoom, which announced flights to Canada for £89 in October.

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5020852.html

Kevin.
Malcolm Ogilvie
2003-11-07 15:10:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevn McM
I'm determined to win a prize in the November competition :) I can only hope
that Ian is putting a copy of 'The West Highland Way in all Seasons' by
I.C.A.N. Post on the prize list.
A TOUR operator has sparked a flights price war by launching direct services
from Glasgow to Toronto for £69 one way.
Canadian Affair, based in Glasgow since 1999, plans to go head-to-head with
Scots firm Zoom, which announced flights to Canada for £89 in October.
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5020852.html
Yes, and when you add the taxes to the Zoom price it comes out at nearer
£130 one way, I gather.
--
Malcolm Ogilvie
Kevn McM
2003-11-07 15:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Malcolm Ogilvie
Post by Kevn McM
I'm determined to win a prize in the November competition :) I can only hope
that Ian is putting a copy of 'The West Highland Way in all Seasons' by
I.C.A.N. Post on the prize list.
A TOUR operator has sparked a flights price war by launching direct services
from Glasgow to Toronto for £69 one way.
Canadian Affair, based in Glasgow since 1999, plans to go head-to-head with
Scots firm Zoom, which announced flights to Canada for £89 in October.
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5020852.html
Yes, and when you add the taxes to the Zoom price it comes out at nearer
£130 one way, I gather.
Yes, airport taxes, security fee ( ? ) etc, soon had the round trip over
250. Cant remeber exact figure but it quickly made you forget the £89 one
way part of the deal.

Kevin.
Scot Kortegaard
2003-11-08 01:14:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevn McM
I'm determined to win a prize in the November competition :) I can only hope
that Ian is putting a copy of 'The West Highland Way in all Seasons' by
I.C.A.N. Post on the prize list.
A TOUR operator has sparked a flights price war by launching direct services
from Glasgow to Toronto for £69 one way.
Canadian Affair, based in Glasgow since 1999, plans to go head-to-head with
Scots firm Zoom, which announced flights to Canada for £89 in October.
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5020852.html
Kevin.
Well, nobody really wants to go to Toronto anyway do they? Last time I
checked, it costs a ruddy fortune to fly from the west coast (of Canada) to
Toronto, or points east. Most times a flight to the UK from Vancouver that
stops over in Toronto is cheaper that Vancouver - Toronto
direct................go figure!
Cheers,
Scot.
P.S. I have seen flights, Vancouver to Glasgow, advertised for roughly $500
Canadian though (probably with a stop in TO).
Adam Whyte-Settlar
2003-11-08 08:16:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevn McM
Post by Kevn McM
I'm determined to win a prize in the November competition :) I can only
hope
Post by Kevn McM
that Ian is putting a copy of 'The West Highland Way in all Seasons' by
I.C.A.N. Post on the prize list.
A TOUR operator has sparked a flights price war by launching direct
services
Post by Kevn McM
from Glasgow to Toronto for £69 one way.
Canadian Affair, based in Glasgow since 1999, plans to go head-to-head
with
Post by Kevn McM
Scots firm Zoom, which announced flights to Canada for £89 in October.
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5020852.html
Kevin.
Well, nobody really wants to go to Toronto anyway do they? Last time I
checked, it costs a ruddy fortune to fly from the west coast (of Canada) to
Toronto, or points east. Most times a flight to the UK from Vancouver that
stops over in Toronto is cheaper that Vancouver - Toronto
direct................go figure!
Cheers,
Scot.
P.S. I have seen flights, Vancouver to Glasgow, advertised for roughly $500
Canadian though (probably with a stop in TO).
Do they actually force you to get out of the plane in Toronto?
Because if not, that's quite a good deal.
A W-S
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-08 12:29:42 UTC
Permalink
"Adam Whyte-Settlar" <***@hotmail.com> wrote
"Scot Kortegaard" <***@shaw.ca> wrote in message
<snip>
Post by Adam Whyte-Settlar
Post by Scot Kortegaard
Well, nobody really wants to go to Toronto anyway do they?
Last time I checked, it costs a ruddy fortune to fly from the
west coast (of Canada) to Toronto, or points east. Most times
a flight to the UK from Vancouver that stops over in Toronto
is cheaper that Vancouver - Toronto direct.........go figure!
P.S. I have seen flights, Vancouver to Glasgow, advertised
for roughly $500 Canadian though (probably with a stop in TO).
Do they actually force you to get out of the plane in Toronto?
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
MacRobert
2003-11-08 17:40:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
<snip>
Post by Adam Whyte-Settlar
Post by Scot Kortegaard
Well, nobody really wants to go to Toronto anyway do they?
Last time I checked, it costs a ruddy fortune to fly from the
west coast (of Canada) to Toronto, or points east. Most times
a flight to the UK from Vancouver that stops over in Toronto
is cheaper that Vancouver - Toronto direct.........go figure!
P.S. I have seen flights, Vancouver to Glasgow, advertised
for roughly $500 Canadian though (probably with a stop in TO).
Do they actually force you to get out of the plane in Toronto?
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit.
I should hope NOT!
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
You mean those cheapskates won't even let you use the chairs?
Still, not as bad as Delta... I remember flying when lunch was rock
Cornish hen, fresh milk, the trip included visits to the cockpit,
pretty stewardesses fetching warm blankets. Now its teency-tiny
seats, knees in your chest and lucky for a surly bag of peanuts.

MacRobert
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-08 18:18:20 UTC
Permalink
Now its teency-tiny seats, knees in your
chest and lucky for a surly bag of
peanuts.
Peanuts? You got peanuts? I got a bag with 6 pretzels! (mini
pretzels)

Elaine
MacRobert
2003-11-08 21:21:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Now its teency-tiny seats, knees in your
chest and lucky for a surly bag of
peanuts.
Peanuts? You got peanuts? I got a bag with 6 pretzels! (mini
pretzels)
Elaine
Well, you're a girl, silly!

MacR
Séimí mac Liam
2003-11-08 21:34:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by MacRobert
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Now its teency-tiny seats, knees in your
chest and lucky for a surly bag of
peanuts.
Peanuts? You got peanuts? I got a bag with 6 pretzels! (mini
pretzels)
Elaine
Well, you're a girl, silly!
MacR
It was the hand on the knee that clued you in, right?
--
Saint Séimí mac Liam
Carriagemaker to the court of Queen Maeve
Prophet of The Great Tagger
Canonized December '99
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-08 22:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Séimí mac Liam
It was the hand on the knee that clued
you in, right?
Well, I do have small hands. That must mean I have a warm heart.
Right? Or am I mixing my metaphors? Maybe I'm just Mrs. Malaprop, and
don't know it.

Elaine
Duke of URL
2003-11-09 13:23:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Post by Séimí mac Liam
It was the hand on the knee that clued
you in, right?
Well, I do have small hands. That must mean I have a warm heart.
Right? Or am I mixing my metaphors? Maybe I'm just Mrs. Malaprop,
and don't know it.
I thought it was "cold feet, warm..." er... aHEM. Myomy, hasn't the
weather made a sudden shift though. The NWS has been claiming visible
snow here for 10 days now and I'ven't seen a flake. I suppose they're
just going to keep on saying "Possible Snow" until someday if finally
does, then they'll say "See? We told you."
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-09 17:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duke of URL
I thought it was "cold feet, warm..." er...
aHEM. Myomy, hasn't the weather
made a sudden shift though. The NWS
has been claiming visible snow here for
10 days now and I'ven't seen a flake. I
suppose they're just going to keep on
saying "Possible Snow" until someday if
finally does, then they'll say "See? We
told you."
Aha! You're Mrs. Malaprop, and I claim my 10 pounds! :)

Elaine
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-08 22:48:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by MacRobert
Well, you're a girl, silly!
You guys get all the breaks. I love peanuts. Don't like pretzels,
however. At least I won't ever run the risk of choking on a pretzel and
passing out (or whatever those long ago allegations were)......

Elaine
MacRobert
2003-11-09 04:53:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Post by MacRobert
Well, you're a girl, silly!
You guys get all the breaks. I love peanuts. Don't like pretzels,
however. At least I won't ever run the risk of choking on a pretzel and
passing out (or whatever those long ago allegations were)......
Elaine
Freud was right. Peanuts envy every single time. Shell deny it butter
words betray her...

MacRobert
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-09 06:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Freud was right. Peanuts envy every
single time. Shell deny it butter words
betray her...
LOL !

Elaine
Duke of URL
2003-11-09 13:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by MacRobert
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Post by MacRobert
Well, you're a girl, silly!
You guys get all the breaks. I love peanuts. Don't like pretzels,
however. At least I won't ever run the risk of choking on a
pretzel and passing out (or whatever those long ago allegations
were)......
Freud was right. Peanuts envy every single time. Shell deny it
butter words betray her...
It's the fault of being low-bread - that always jams one up.
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-09 17:36:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duke of URL
It's the fault of being low-bread - that
always jams one up.
Challah have you know, I don't eat jam!

Elaine
Jim Stewart
2003-11-09 05:57:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elaine Goldberg
Post by MacRobert
Well, you're a girl, silly!
You guys get all the breaks. I love peanuts. Don't like pretzels,
however. At least I won't ever run the risk of choking on a pretzel and
passing out (or whatever those long ago allegations were)......
Elaine
They have cut down on peanuts because of the severe allergies some
people have.

Jim Stewart
S Viemeister
2003-11-08 18:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
Many, many years ago (in the days of prop planes), most transatlantic
flights from the US east coast stopped at Gander (sometimes Labrador
and/or Iceland). I remember getting off the plane on those flights.
Josiah Jenkins
2003-11-09 00:24:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 Nov 2003 18:56:43 +0000, I read these words from S
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
Many, many years ago (in the days of prop planes), most transatlantic
flights from the US east coast stopped at Gander (sometimes Labrador
and/or Iceland). I remember getting off the plane on those flights.
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?

-- The Despicable Stewart
-- Perfidious Alban
-- http://www.ian-stewart.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
S Viemeister
2003-11-09 08:28:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).

Sheila
Murchadh
2003-11-11 04:34:20 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 08:28:10 +0000, S Viemeister
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.

Murchadh.
S Viemeister
2003-11-11 09:57:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there. In my part of Sutherland, palm trees can grow outside all
year round, magnolias bloom in February, and I still have roses (and a
number of other flowers) in my garden.
The main problem here, apart from public transport, is trying to get
tradesmen to turn up when you need them.
In the past couple I've weeks I've had my Rayburn stop working (heating
engineer required) and needed the immersion element in the water tank
replaced (electrician required). When the electrician finally arrived,
it was determined that the tank also needed replacing (plumber
required). The plumber and his assistant turned up, and determined
which tank to order. Fortunately, the washing machine and the
dishwasher heat their own water, and I have an electric shower.
The heating engineer did turn up, and the Rayburn is now working again,
so I don't need to keep the fire in the living room on all day (the back
boiler in the fireplace can run the central heating). For those who are
unfamiliar with Rayburns, they are range cookers (rather like, and made
by the same company as, Agas), which provide a large cooking surface,
ovens, heat domestic hot water, and run the central heating. They're
also good for drying laundry - on the rail at the front, and on
old-fashioned airers on pulleys mounted to the ceiling over the unit.
Murchadh
2003-11-11 13:49:32 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 09:57:18 +0000, S Viemeister
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there. In my part of Sutherland, palm trees can grow outside all
year round, magnolias bloom in February, and I still have roses (and a
number of other flowers) in my garden.
The main problem here, apart from public transport, is trying to get
tradesmen to turn up when you need them.
In the past couple I've weeks I've had my Rayburn stop working (heating
engineer required) and needed the immersion element in the water tank
replaced (electrician required). When the electrician finally arrived,
it was determined that the tank also needed replacing (plumber
required). The plumber and his assistant turned up, and determined
which tank to order. Fortunately, the washing machine and the
dishwasher heat their own water, and I have an electric shower.
The heating engineer did turn up, and the Rayburn is now working again,
so I don't need to keep the fire in the living room on all day (the back
boiler in the fireplace can run the central heating). For those who are
unfamiliar with Rayburns, they are range cookers (rather like, and made
by the same company as, Agas), which provide a large cooking surface,
ovens, heat domestic hot water, and run the central heating. They're
also good for drying laundry - on the rail at the front, and on
old-fashioned airers on pulleys mounted to the ceiling over the unit.
You done rather a good job of explaining why living in the remoter
parts of the Highlands is such a lot of work!

With an outbound ferry once a week to the Isles, everything took on
its own time frame. Sending a letter and waiting for a reply used to
take up large parts of one's life.

Murchadh.
S Viemeister
2003-11-12 10:17:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Murchadh
You done rather a good job of explaining why living in the remoter
parts of the Highlands is such a lot of work!
With an outbound ferry once a week to the Isles, everything took on
its own time frame. Sending a letter and waiting for a reply used to
take up large parts of one's life.
Living on the mainland has its advantages!
You'd be amazed how many little croft houses have fax machines, internet
access, and satellite dishes.
And the postal service up here is excellent, providing transport, post,
milk, newspapers and gossip. The PostBus driver even replaced a slate
on my roof, and didn't want to accept payment.

Sheila
Elaine Goldberg
2003-11-12 14:41:31 UTC
Permalink
Sheila wrote:

<snip>
Post by S Viemeister
And the postal service up here is
excellent, providing transport, post,
milk, newspapers and gossip. The
PostBus driver even replaced a slate on
my roof, and didn't want to accept
payment.
Isn't it great? I had purchased an unassembled storage shed (4' X 6' X
18") and discovered I couldn't fit the pieces in my van. One of the
store employees who lives a few miles from me delivered it, and wouldn't
accept any payment.

I'd been assured that assembling it would be a one-person job. Not so.
I'd get the thing half put together, and it kept springing apart on me.
I just needed more hands.

When the exterminator came last week (squirrels in the attic) he helped
me, and we got the thing put together. The pieces had been leaning up
against the house for a few weeks. He even climbed his extension ladder
and removed a burnt out lightbulb from atop my roof. He'll replace it
on his next visit. I'd been without that outside floodlight for a
couple of years!

I love how helpful people are when you live in rural areas.

Elaine
Jim Stewart
2003-11-11 14:49:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there. In my part of Sutherland, palm trees can grow outside all
year round, magnolias bloom in February, and I still have roses (and a
number of other flowers) in my garden.
The main problem here, apart from public transport, is trying to get
tradesmen to turn up when you need them.
In the past couple I've weeks I've had my Rayburn stop working (heating
engineer required) and needed the immersion element in the water tank
replaced (electrician required). When the electrician finally arrived,
it was determined that the tank also needed replacing (plumber
required). The plumber and his assistant turned up, and determined
which tank to order. Fortunately, the washing machine and the
dishwasher heat their own water, and I have an electric shower.
The heating engineer did turn up, and the Rayburn is now working again,
so I don't need to keep the fire in the living room on all day (the back
boiler in the fireplace can run the central heating). For those who are
unfamiliar with Rayburns, they are range cookers (rather like, and made
by the same company as, Agas), which provide a large cooking surface,
ovens, heat domestic hot water, and run the central heating. They're
also good for drying laundry - on the rail at the front, and on
old-fashioned airers on pulleys mounted to the ceiling over the unit.
The icelanders do have the hot springs supply excellent, foolproof
heating and hot water.
No problem with staying warm indoors or at the pool....

Jim Stewart
Sigvaldi Eggertsson
2003-11-11 17:45:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there.
Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are
35-45°C warmer than elsewhere at the same latitude. Eastern and
central Europe, in addition to Canada and the central and northern
parts of the USA have colder winters than Iceland, so the ice is not a
hindrance to anyone living there.
Malcolm Ogilvie
2003-11-11 19:44:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there.
Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are
35-45°C warmer than elsewhere at the same latitude.
Err, no, that cannot possibly be true.

The mean mid-winter (December-January) temperature at Reykjavik is 0-1
degrees C.

All other places at the same latitude do NOT experience mean winter
temperatures of minus 35-45 degrees C.
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Eastern and
central Europe, in addition to Canada and the central and northern
parts of the USA have colder winters than Iceland, so the ice is not a
hindrance to anyone living there.
--
Malcolm Ogilvie
Jim Stewart
2003-11-12 04:42:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there.
Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are
35-45°C warmer than elsewhere at the same latitude. Eastern and
central Europe, in addition to Canada and the central and northern
parts of the USA have colder winters than Iceland, so the ice is not a
hindrance to anyone living there.
Now, the winds and snow are quite another story.....
To be told at Karoline's in Aukreyri....

Jim Stewart
Sigvaldi Eggertsson
2003-11-12 13:53:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there.
Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are
35-45°C warmer than elsewhere at the same latitude. Eastern and
central Europe, in addition to Canada and the central and northern
parts of the USA have colder winters than Iceland, so the ice is not a
hindrance to anyone living there.
Now, the winds and snow are quite another story.....
To be told at Karoline's in Aukreyri....
Jim Stewart
Akureyri is of course a bit different than the south, 70% chance of
white christmas in Akureyri, less than 50% in Reykjavík.
Jim Stewart
2003-11-12 18:13:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Sigvaldi Eggertsson
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Murchadh
Sure beats Sutherland! All that hot water and the ponies trotting
everywhere.
Hmph.
I enjoyed visiting Iceland, but there was too much ice for me to want to
live there.
Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are
35-45°C warmer than elsewhere at the same latitude. Eastern and
central Europe, in addition to Canada and the central and northern
parts of the USA have colder winters than Iceland, so the ice is not a
hindrance to anyone living there.
Now, the winds and snow are quite another story.....
To be told at Karoline's in Aukreyri....
Jim Stewart
Akureyri is of course a bit different than the south, 70% chance of
white christmas in Akureyri, less than 50% in Reykjavík.
Both cities are fine places to be. But, of course, very different.
Reykjavik is co cosmopolitan
while Akureyri is so, well "home style." Our southern mountineers could
really learn to ski there...

Jim Stewart
Lindy1026
2003-11-16 06:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Date: 11/9/2003 12:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
I dunno. I've heard it said that you can spend a month there one day, and if
you are hungry, you can try the fish. Or there's always the fish. Of course,
some people prefer the fish....

-Melin
Jim Stewart
2003-11-16 07:20:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lindy1026
Date: 11/9/2003 12:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
I dunno. I've heard it said that you can spend a month there one day, and if
you are hungry, you can try the fish. Or there's always the fish. Of course,
some people prefer the fish....
-Melin
Hey, the lamb is very good. Even the mutton...

However, for the holiday season they prepare the specialty. pickled
meats aged from well, aged from.....

Jim Stewart
Josiah Jenkins
2003-11-16 16:11:05 UTC
Permalink
On 16 Nov 2003 06:49:59 GMT, I read these words from
Post by Lindy1026
Date: 11/9/2003 12:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
I dunno. I've heard it said that you can spend a month there one day, and if
you are hungry, you can try the fish. Or there's always the fish. Of course,
some people prefer the fish....
Or Puffin !!

-- The Despicable Stewart
-- Perfidious Alban
-- http://www.ian-stewart.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
Jim Stewart
2003-11-16 21:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josiah Jenkins
On 16 Nov 2003 06:49:59 GMT, I read these words from
Post by Lindy1026
Date: 11/9/2003 12:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
I dunno. I've heard it said that you can spend a month there one day, and if
you are hungry, you can try the fish. Or there's always the fish. Of course,
some people prefer the fish....
Or Puffin !!
Or bird eggs from the cliffs...

Jim Stewart
Mike MacKinnon
2003-11-17 13:46:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Josiah Jenkins
On 16 Nov 2003 06:49:59 GMT, I read these words from
Post by Lindy1026
Date: 11/9/2003 12:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
Post by Josiah Jenkins
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I quite liked the few days I spent in Iceland in January (many years
ago).
Sheila
I dunno. I've heard it said that you can spend a month there one day, and if
you are hungry, you can try the fish. Or there's always the fish. Of course,
some people prefer the fish....
Or Puffin !!
Or bird eggs from the cliffs...
Jim Stewart
Don't complanin. The birds eggs kept the rockets out of Barra (Todday!)

M

Helen Ramsay
2003-11-09 16:53:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josiah Jenkins
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
Many, many years ago (in the days of prop planes), most transatlantic
flights from the US east coast stopped at Gander (sometimes Labrador
and/or Iceland). I remember getting off the plane on those flights.
To be fair, who's likely to to try to "jump ship" in those places ?
I agree. The word desolate springs to mind. That's how it looked from the
air and the airport didn't help the impression:)

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
Jim Stewart
2003-11-09 05:56:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
Many, many years ago (in the days of prop planes), most transatlantic
flights from the US east coast stopped at Gander (sometimes Labrador
and/or Iceland). I remember getting off the plane on those flights.
They INSIST you get off the plane in Kevlick. The waiting room is a
duty-free shop.

I never have gotten off in transit, the plane was always completely stopped.

Jim Stewart
S Viemeister
2003-11-09 08:26:47 UTC
Permalink
They INSIST you get off the plane in Kevflavick.
And you don't generally continue your flight on the same aircraft.
The waiting room is a duty-free shop.
I have relatives-by-marriage who have financial interests in the shop
(none of the cash has rubbed off, unfortunately).

Sheila
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-09 16:52:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
I never have gotten off in transit, the plane was always completely stopped.
Smartass! Everybody's a comedian :)

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-09 16:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
Many, many years ago (in the days of prop planes), most transatlantic
flights from the US east coast stopped at Gander (sometimes Labrador
and/or Iceland). I remember getting off the plane on those flights.
You're right about that. When I first came to Canada (supposed to be on a 3
months student exchange) the plane was a propeller job ... Maritime Central
Airways DC4. We stopped at an airport (Keflavik) near the city of
Reykjavik, and we did deplane. I think they had to refuel for the last leg
to Dorval airport outside of Montreal.

What a drag! I believe it was a US Navy air station and the only currency
they accepted was US$ or their own Icelandic currency. We couldn't even buy
a cuppa! If I remember correctly (it was 46 years ago) there was a store in
the waiting area that took British currency and I bought a few postcards
and stamps which I still have somewhere about the place.

The landing was one never to be forgotten though. The pilot overshot the
runway and had to go back up for another run at it. It might not have been
so bad, but the cabin wasn't pressurised and I thought my eardrums would
burst! I used to tell my kids that was the only reason I never went back
... I was afraid to get on that plane with the same pilot in case he pulled
the same stunt at Prestwick:)

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
ejaycee
2003-11-09 05:21:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
I've never been on a trans-atlantic where passengers were allowed off the
plane while in transit. I've had more than a few boring sits on the ground
in Manchester when I've gone with Air Canada.
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?

Ejaycee>
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-09 16:57:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from Australia
or New Zealand!

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
James W. West
2003-11-09 19:17:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from Australia
or New Zealand!
Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
The furthest I have flown is to Florida from Glasgow, about 9 hours. My
parents came with us. To put it in context both myself and my father are
similar restless type characters who could never spend our lives in an
office.
About half way across my father gave me a poke and said

'Hey min, my erse is sair!' I said 'Div ee think mine een's nae?'

Two minutes later I get another poke.

'Is there nithing faster?' I said 'Aye- Concorde.' 'Fit dis at cost?'
'Aboot two thoosan poun each wie.'

A slightly longer pause this time, then another poke

'Is there nithing in atween?'


James
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-09 20:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from
Australia
Post by Helen Ramsay
or New Zealand!
The furthest I have flown is to Florida from Glasgow, about 9 hours. My
parents came with us. To put it in context both myself and my father are
similar restless type characters who could never spend our lives in an
office.
About half way across my father gave me a poke and said
'Hey min, my erse is sair!' I said 'Div ee think mine een's nae?'
Two minutes later I get another poke.
'Is there nithing faster?' I said 'Aye- Concorde.' 'Fit dis at cost?'
'Aboot two thoosan poun each wie.'
A slightly longer pause this time, then another poke
'Is there nithing in atween?'
Thanks for the chuckle James!

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
Jim Stewart
2003-11-09 23:19:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from
Australia
Post by Helen Ramsay
or New Zealand!
Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
The furthest I have flown is to Florida from Glasgow, about 9 hours. My
parents came with us. To put it in context both myself and my father are
similar restless type characters who could never spend our lives in an
office.
About half way across my father gave me a poke and said
'Hey min, my erse is sair!' I said 'Div ee think mine een's nae?'
Two minutes later I get another poke.
'Is there nithing faster?' I said 'Aye- Concorde.' 'Fit dis at cost?'
'Aboot two thoosan poun each wie.'
A slightly longer pause this time, then another poke
'Is there nithing in atween?'
James
El Paso to Kuala Limpur. Stops in LAX, Honolulu, Tokyo, Hong Kong,
Singapore. No stop longer than 4 hours. Took 28
actual hours. We looked like zombees upon landing. Learned to stop
overnight at each place. Low cost interpassage hotels
then. Buy your bunk with your ticket.


Jim Stewart
ejaycee
2003-11-10 10:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from Australia
<snip>
Post by Jim Stewart
El Paso to Kuala Limpur. Stops in LAX, Honolulu, Tokyo, Hong Kong,
Singapore. No stop longer than 4 hours. Took 28
actual hours. We looked like zombees upon landing. Learned to stop
overnight at each place. Low cost interpassage hotels
then. Buy your bunk with your ticket.
The only way to do the long distances in comfort is to have at least
one stop over of 2/3 days. More if you can get them
Change of sceney, decent shower, decent sleep and change of clothing
makes it much more civilized. Eat little and don't have any alcohol.
A water mist spray for your face helps with the dry atmosphere. Don't
take your shoes off - you might not get them back on. Get off and have
a walk around where ever they land
Last time we went to we didn't have time for a stop over but I did
find my own TV in the back of the chair in front made the time pass
quicker and we did get a sight seeing trip in Vienna which passed the
waiting time nicely.
My favourite seats are any of the last three doubles on the outside at
the back of the
plane. More room, no one to bother getting out, near the loos and
emergency exits.

Last time we flew with Lauda [?] which was a good flight out but they
let us down badly on the return flight which turned into a nightmare.

My main problem with long distance flying is the fact I get dreadful
pains in my ears and down my neck every time we descend and I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.

Ejaycee
Ian Morrison
2003-11-10 12:49:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by ejaycee
I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
I thought there was going to be drug testing at the quilters' event next
year (I assume you are referring to that). Mind you, I'm not sure if
mogadon is on the list of banned substances for quilters.

------
Ian O.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
ejaycee
2003-11-11 06:19:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Morrison
Post by ejaycee
I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
I thought there was going to be drug testing at the quilters' event next
year (I assume you are referring to that). Mind you, I'm not sure if
mogadon is on the list of banned substances for quilters.
No no not at the group
just for the flight

Ejaycee
MacRobert
2003-11-10 15:04:17 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 10:26:00 GMT, "ejaycee"
Post by ejaycee
My main problem with long distance flying is the fact I get dreadful
pains in my ears and down my neck every time we descend and I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
Ejaycee
If you think you have a pain in the neck *before* you meet the
gang...!

MacR
Helen Ramsay
2003-11-10 16:34:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by MacRobert
Post by ejaycee
My main problem with long distance flying is the fact I get dreadful
pains in my ears and down my neck every time we descend and I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
If you think you have a pain in the neck *before* you meet the
gang...!
What! Are you saving up to go? <G>

Cheers, Helen
--
hramsay at cogeco dot ca
MacRobert
2003-11-11 01:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by MacRobert
Post by ejaycee
My main problem with long distance flying is the fact I get dreadful
pains in my ears and down my neck every time we descend and I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
If you think you have a pain in the neck *before* you meet the
gang...!
What! Are you saving up to go? <G>
Cheers, Helen
ooooo! why, I oughta.....
Sally
2003-11-10 16:42:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest
flight I
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Helen Ramsay
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5
hours 45
Post by Jim Stewart
Post by Helen Ramsay
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from Australia
<snip>
Post by Jim Stewart
El Paso to Kuala Limpur. Stops in LAX, Honolulu, Tokyo, Hong Kong,
Singapore. No stop longer than 4 hours. Took 28
actual hours. We looked like zombees upon landing. Learned to stop
overnight at each place. Low cost interpassage hotels
then. Buy your bunk with your ticket.
The only way to do the long distances in comfort is to have at least
one stop over of 2/3 days. More if you can get them
Change of sceney, decent shower, decent sleep and change of clothing
makes it much more civilized. Eat little and don't have any alcohol.
A water mist spray for your face helps with the dry atmosphere. Don't
take your shoes off - you might not get them back on. Get off and have
a walk around where ever they land
Last time we went to we didn't have time for a stop over but I did
find my own TV in the back of the chair in front made the time pass
quicker and we did get a sight seeing trip in Vienna which passed the
waiting time nicely.
My favourite seats are any of the last three doubles on the outside at
the back of the
plane. More room, no one to bother getting out, near the loos and
emergency exits.
Last time we flew with Lauda [?] which was a good flight out but they
let us down badly on the return flight which turned into a nightmare.
My main problem with long distance flying is the fact I get dreadful
pains in my ears and down my neck every time we descend and I am
dreading next years flight.
It also doesn't help that I am slightly claustrophobic.
Guess I will take a Mogadon or whatever the Dr suggests.
Ejaycee
My problem is I can never get comfortable. Have long legs and unless I
sit bolt upright the entire time my knees are in the folded up table.
No use getting an aisle seat, can't put feet in the aisle. The staff
keeping moving back and forth. Not enough overhead light to see to
read. The fool in front of me who wants to put their seat back means
I have a head in my lap and now crushed legs to boot. Only
anticipation of arriving keeps me going. Eight hours to Lunnon and
then airport dash and confusion as to where I am to be next to get the
flight to Embra - So glad to get there. Yeah - well beats two weeks
on the ocean! Have every intention to be in Scotland next summer or
whenever. Sally
Lachie
2003-11-10 01:00:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Helen Ramsay
Post by ejaycee
What duration of time are the flights between Canada and UK?
Approx. 6 hours going to Scotland and 7 coming back. The quickest flight I
ever had was when I went home for my Dad's funeral in 1972 ...5 hours 45
minutes! I get antsy at that. Heavens knows what I'd be like from Australia
or New Zealand!
Worst flight without a shad was LGW to Melbourne, 37 hours of pure
unadulterated shite.
Continental, Tristar or a DC10, via Houston, LA, Honolulu, Auckland.

Closely followed by LHR to Singapore, via Moscow, Delhi in the Russian
equivalent of the VC10, it made 3 attempts at landing at Delhi and a 2
day delay in Moscow on the return. However a kindly shot
putter/stewardess did introduce me to the delights of the mango. You
cannae whack Aeroflot.
--
Lachie Macquarie.
Who's afraid of flying? I'm just afraid of of crashing.
Jesus can you save us? I'll become Jehovah's witness.
LWIII
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