Discussion:
"A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100 year wait"
(too old to reply)
La N
2009-12-11 05:19:58 UTC
Permalink
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article6952266.ece
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low

The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years

Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that in
company.

The one thing it is not is English. The English make beer and gin and even
have a go at making wine occasionally, just to annoy the French. But the
whisky making they leave to their neighbours north of the Border.

Until now. Yesterday the first English whisky for more than a century was
bottled at a distillery in Norfolk, using English barley and English water
distilled by a team of English workers under the direction of a man whose
preferred tipple has always been red wine.

They were, however, trained by a Scot: some things are, perhaps,
unavoidable.

Related Links
a.. 'By George, I think they have got it'
a.. Rye beats Scotch to title of world's best whisky
a.. Anger at sale of English whisky
The first limited edition bottling at St George's Distillery, which has
already been well received by whisky aficionados, has long been a sell-out.
The next one, a peated version, goes on sale next spring and is, at the time
of writing, still available.

"But by tomorrow morning, who knows?" the managing director Andrew Nelstrop
said at the end of a day so busy that the small family firm in the village
of Roudham, near Thetford, stopped answering the phone.

For the Nelstrops, a well-established Norfolk farming family, the dream of
making whisky in a part of the country better known for turnips and turkeys
is one that they have been nurturing for more than 40 years.

"My grandfather said to my father, 'I cannot believe we grow all this barley
to send to Scotland to make whisky'," Mr Nelstrop, 37, said. "It stuck in my
father's brain for 40 years. He and I have been having the same discussion
about it for 20 years. Then, finally, we were in a position to do something
about it."

According to Mr Nelstrop - and this is a matter of some debate among whisky
experts - the last place in England to make whisky was a distillery in
Stratford, East London, which changed to gin production in the 1890s and
then burnt down.

"Virtually every country in the world makes whisky. The only oddity is that
the English have not made it before. The Scots took the role of making
whisky and the English took the role of making gin. But we've got the
barley - East Anglia supplies 60 per cent of all Scotland's barley needs -
and we've got perfect water."

The water for St George's comes from a supply 160ft (50m) below the
distillery via a borehole in the garden. The family - the company is run by
Mr Nelstrop, his father James, who is chairman, his mother and his sister -
took the decision to go ahead in September 2005 and were distilling by
November 2006. Three years and £2.5 million later, that spirit, matured in
charred, white-oak, bourbon barrels, can now be called single malt whisky.
With production of up to 200,000 bottles a year, it will sell for about £35.

Mr Nelstrop Sr is the whisky buff; Andrew Nelstrop admits that, before they
embarked on their distillery venture, all he knew about whisky was what he
learnt in his local pub. "I was very much take it or leave it," he said.
"I'm
a red wine man."

Iain Henderson, the Scot formerly in charge at the Laphroaig distillery, was
persuaded to come out of retirement to train the Norfolk team. A Scot
teaching the English to make whisky does, Mr Nelstrop admitted, sound
implausible, if not downright unpatriotic.

"He gave us a year before disappearing up north again. And yes, they did let
him back in."

Water of life

- The name whisky comes from the Gaelic word usquebaugh, meaning "water of
life"

- Early distillation practices originated in Asia and were used for the
production of perfume and medicine before arriving in Europe through the
monasteries

- The Scotch Whisky Order 1990 states that a Scotch must be distilled from
water and malted barley, to which only other whole grains may be added. The
drink cannot be casked for any less than three years and one day, and must
be at least 40 per cent alcohol but no more than 98.4 per cent

- The industry in Scotland employs 40,000 people and generates more than
£800 million a year through export sales
Nebulous
2009-12-11 07:25:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
- The Scotch Whisky Order 1990 states that a Scotch must be distilled from
water and malted barley, to which only other whole grains may be added. The
drink cannot be casked for any less than three years and one day, and must
be at least 40 per cent alcohol but no more than 98.4 per cent
- The industry in Scotland employs 40,000 people and generates more than
£800 million a year through export sales
That figure seems on the low side. It may be that it has just been
clumsily worded and they in fact mean profits.

If I recall correctly exports are well over £2 billion.

Neb
jon.in.durham
2009-12-12 16:33:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article6952266.
ece
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that in
company.
The one thing it is not is English. The English make beer and gin and even
have a go at making wine occasionally, just to annoy the French. But the
whisky making they leave to their neighbours north of the Border.
Until now. Yesterday the first English whisky for more than a century was
bottled at a distillery in Norfolk, using English barley and English water
distilled by a team of English workers under the direction of a man whose
preferred tipple has always been red wine.
They were, however, trained by a Scot: some things are, perhaps,
unavoidable.
Related Links
a.. 'By George, I think they have got it'
a.. Rye beats Scotch to title of world's best whisky
a.. Anger at sale of English whisky
The first limited edition bottling at St George's Distillery, which has
already been well received by whisky aficionados, has long been a sell-out.
The next one, a peated version, goes on sale next spring and is, at the time
of writing, still available.
"But by tomorrow morning, who knows?" the managing director Andrew Nelstrop
said at the end of a day so busy that the small family firm in the village
of Roudham, near Thetford, stopped answering the phone.
For the Nelstrops, a well-established Norfolk farming family, the dream of
making whisky in a part of the country better known for turnips and turkeys
is one that they have been nurturing for more than 40 years.
"My grandfather said to my father, 'I cannot believe we grow all this barley
to send to Scotland to make whisky'," Mr Nelstrop, 37, said. "It stuck in my
father's brain for 40 years. He and I have been having the same discussion
about it for 20 years. Then, finally, we were in a position to do something
about it."
According to Mr Nelstrop - and this is a matter of some debate among whisky
experts - the last place in England to make whisky was a distillery in
Stratford, East London, which changed to gin production in the 1890s and
then burnt down.
"Virtually every country in the world makes whisky. The only oddity is that
the English have not made it before. The Scots took the role of making
whisky and the English took the role of making gin. But we've got the
barley - East Anglia supplies 60 per cent of all Scotland's barley needs -
and we've got perfect water."
The water for St George's comes from a supply 160ft (50m) below the
distillery via a borehole in the garden. The family - the company is run by
Mr Nelstrop, his father James, who is chairman, his mother and his sister -
took the decision to go ahead in September 2005 and were distilling by
November 2006. Three years and £2.5 million later, that spirit, matured in
charred, white-oak, bourbon barrels, can now be called single malt whisky.
With production of up to 200,000 bottles a year, it will sell for about £35.
Mr Nelstrop Sr is the whisky buff; Andrew Nelstrop admits that, before they
embarked on their distillery venture, all he knew about whisky was what he
learnt in his local pub. "I was very much take it or leave it," he said.
"I'm
a red wine man."
Iain Henderson, the Scot formerly in charge at the Laphroaig distillery, was
persuaded to come out of retirement to train the Norfolk team. A Scot
teaching the English to make whisky does, Mr Nelstrop admitted, sound
implausible, if not downright unpatriotic.
"He gave us a year before disappearing up north again. And yes, they did let
him back in."
Water of life
- The name whisky comes from the Gaelic word usquebaugh, meaning "water of
life"
- Early distillation practices originated in Asia and were used for the
production of perfume and medicine before arriving in Europe through the
monasteries
- The Scotch Whisky Order 1990 states that a Scotch must be distilled from
water and malted barley, to which only other whole grains may be added. The
drink cannot be casked for any less than three years and one day, and must
be at least 40 per cent alcohol but no more than 98.4 per cent
- The industry in Scotland employs 40,000 people and generates more than
£800 million a year through export sales
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky, it's not as if they are
misleading anyone by calling it 'scotch'

I hope some more distilleries start up, and put the squeeze on you bunch
of T**ts
soupdragon
2009-12-12 17:57:10 UTC
Permalink
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article
Post by jon.in.durham
6952266. ece
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky,
They can make anything they want, just doen't expect anyone to drink
it.
Post by jon.in.durham
it's not as if they are
misleading anyone by calling it 'scotch'
Sure they are.

To be called Scotch whisky the spirit must conform to the standards of
the Scotch Whisky Order of 1990 (UK), which clarified the Scotch Whisky
Act 1988, and mandates that the spirit:

1. Must be distilled at a Scottish distillery from water and malted

Oops!
Allan
2009-12-12 18:25:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by jon.in.durham
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky, it's not as if they are
misleading anyone by calling it 'scotch'
I don't think anyone was suggesting they can't make it! There is a Welsh
whisky too.
Post by jon.in.durham
I hope some more distilleries start up, and put the squeeze on you bunch
of T**ts
And like that is going to happen!

Allan
The Phantom Piper
2009-12-12 19:33:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by jon.in.durham
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky
They do. They call it, "Gin."


Happy To Help,

The Phantom Piper
Custos Custodum
2009-12-12 19:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Phantom Piper
Post by jon.in.durham
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky
They do. They call it, "Gin."
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
La N
2009-12-12 20:09:33 UTC
Permalink
news:b60e8053-
Post by The Phantom Piper
Post by jon.in.durham
Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky
They do. They call it, "Gin."
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
And drank by 14-year-old girls in Canada

- nilita (not mentioning names, though I seem to recall it tasted like Aqua
Velva smelled)
Fred J. McCall
2009-12-12 21:01:20 UTC
Permalink
"La N" <***@yahoo.com> wrote:

:Custos Custodum wrote:
:> The Phantom Piper <***@comcast.net> wrote in
:> news:b60e8053-
:> 9021-4d53-b9f7-***@m33g2000pri.googlegroups.com:
:>
:>> On Dec 12, 8:33 am, "jon.in.durham" <***@no.email.co.uk> wrote:
:>>>
:>>> Why the fuck can't england make it own whisky
:>>
:>> They do. They call it, "Gin."
:>>
:>
:> Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
:
:And drank by 14-year-old girls in Canada
:
:- nilita (not mentioning names, though I seem to recall it tasted like Aqua
:Velva smelled)
:

Gin tastes like you're drinking old Christmas trees. ICK!!
--
"I'll learn to work the saxophone.
I'll play just what I feel.
Drink Scotch whisky all night long
And die behind the wheel."
-- "Deacon Blues", Steely Dan
The Phantom Piper
2009-12-13 07:58:11 UTC
Permalink
Gin tastes like you're drinking old Christmas trees.  ICK!!
Juniper Berries. But that statement falls apart with
Tanqueray and, to a lesser extent, Bombay Sapphire.

Tanqueray tastes like drinking Christmas Trees mixed
with French Perfume, while the Sapphire is a bit more
like Boodles. Booth's and Beefeater are nasty.

An interesting fact: not only can you stave off the effects
of Malaria with Gin and Tonic (and Scurvy too, if you put
a slice of Lime in), but the mixture has a lovely cloudy
*blue* tint to it if the glass is held just right in the fading
rays of the setting sun.

Or so I'm told: I never touch the stuff myself!


Barely Lying,

The Phantom Piper
La N
2009-12-13 08:11:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Phantom Piper
Tanqueray tastes like drinking Christmas Trees mixed
with French Perfume, while the Sapphire is a bit more
like Boodles. Booth's and Beefeater are nasty.
Okay, now this brings back memories. One of my exes (read that: one of
those who scared me away when speaking of walking to the altar) introduced
me to the joys of Tanqueray and 7(Up) with a twist of lime. That was a long
time ago, but I don't recall a terrible aversion to it.

- nilita
Fred J. McCall
2009-12-13 18:32:24 UTC
Permalink
"La N" <***@yahoo.com> wrote:

:The Phantom Piper wrote:
:> On Dec 12, 1:01 pm, Fred J. McCall <***@gmail.com> wrote:
: >
:> Tanqueray tastes like drinking Christmas Trees mixed
:> with French Perfume, while the Sapphire is a bit more
:> like Boodles. Booth's and Beefeater are nasty.
:>
:
:Okay, now this brings back memories. One of my exes (read that: one of
:those who scared me away when speaking of walking to the altar) ...
:

You mean one of the ones who ran away when you started talking about
the altar, right?

:
:... introduced
:me to the joys of Tanqueray and 7(Up) with a twist of lime. That was a long
:time ago, but I don't recall a terrible aversion to it.
:

Of course you don't. That's what putting poison in your body DOES is
destroy your memory and you certainly can't convince anyone who's
tasted it that gin is a *beverage*.
--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
Fifeshire Floozie
2009-12-13 20:15:52 UTC
Permalink
.> Gin tastes like you're drinking old Christmas trees. ICK!!
Juniper Berries. But that statement falls apart with
Tanqueray and, to a lesser extent, Bombay Sapphire.
Tanqueray tastes like drinking Christmas Trees mixed
with French Perfume, while the Sapphire is a bit more
like Boodles. Booth's and Beefeater are nasty.
I tried it once and hated it because it tasted like what I imagined
drinking perfume would taste. Yuck!
Ejaycee
2009-12-15 07:00:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
.> Gin tastes like you're drinking old Christmas trees. ICK!!
Juniper Berries. But that statement falls apart with
Tanqueray and, to a lesser extent, Bombay Sapphire.
Tanqueray tastes like drinking Christmas Trees mixed
with French Perfume, while the Sapphire is a bit more
like Boodles. Booth's and Beefeater are nasty.
I tried it once and hated it because it tasted like what I imagined
drinking perfume would taste. Yuck!
There is something very civilized about sitting at your leisure
on a warm summer evening with a long gin and tonic over ice
with a slice of lime or lemon. Frightfully Good what.

Ejay

The Phantom Piper
2009-12-13 07:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
And drank by 14-year-old girls in Canada
Now *that* I knew - and not just in Canada!


Good Mornin' L'il Schoolgirl,

The Once-Young Piper
The Phantom Piper
2009-12-13 07:48:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Custos Custodum
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
!?

Really? I didn't know that! Are you having me on, old chap?

(If true, it's got to be a most Cunning Plan: they rot their
livers with one of the most harmful forms of distilled spirits
and we make the profits from preparing the poison!)


Pip-Pip, Cheerio,

The Phantom Piper
Custos Custodum
2009-12-13 12:15:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Phantom Piper
Post by Custos Custodum
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
!?
Really? I didn't know that! Are you having me on, old chap?
Would I?

http://www.diageoinscotland.com/en-gb/OurBrands/AllourbrandsA-Z/gin/

AFAIAA, the Cameron Brig distillery at Windygates is the sole source of
Gordon's gin, allegedly the world's biggest seller.
Fifeshire Floozie
2009-12-13 20:23:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Custos Custodum
Post by The Phantom Piper
Post by Custos Custodum
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
!?
Really? I didn't know that! Are you having me on, old chap?
Would I?
http://www.diageoinscotland.com/en-gb/OurBrands/AllourbrandsA-Z/gin/
AFAIAA, the Cameron Brig distillery at Windygates is the sole source of
Gordon's gin, allegedly the world's biggest seller.
That must be the one that shows up as Leven on their map ...

Loading Image...

http://tinyurl.com/ydatjph
Custos Custodum
2009-12-13 21:03:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by Custos Custodum
Post by The Phantom Piper
Post by Custos Custodum
Most of which is distilled in Scotland.
!?
Really? I didn't know that! Are you having me on, old chap?
Would I?
http://www.diageoinscotland.com/en-gb/OurBrands/AllourbrandsA-Z/gin/
AFAIAA, the Cameron Brig distillery at Windygates is the sole source of
Gordon's gin, allegedly the world's biggest seller.
That must be the one that shows up as Leven on their map ...
http://www.diageoinscotland.com/NR/rdonlyres/C66C9E76-A0F0-4E0C-ABEE-1D
047A1BFBE3/0/scotland_map_hr.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/ydatjph
No, that's the big bottling plant (or is it a bonded warehouse?) you see on
the left as you drive into Leven from the west. The distillery is shown
next to it on the map, marked Cameronbridge.
Fifeshire Floozie
2009-12-14 07:00:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Custos Custodum
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by Custos Custodum
AFAIAA, the Cameron Brig distillery at Windygates is the sole
source
Post by Custos Custodum
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Post by Custos Custodum
of Gordon's gin, allegedly the world's biggest seller.
That must be the one that shows up as Leven on their map ...
http://www.diageoinscotland.com/NR/rdonlyres/C66C9E76-A0F0-4E0C-ABEE-1D047A1BFBE3/0/scotland_map_hr.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/ydatjph
No, that's the big bottling plant (or is it a bonded warehouse?) you see on
the left as you drive into Leven from the west. The distillery is shown
next to it on the map, marked Cameronbridge.
Right!
http://www.multimap.com/maps/?qs=windygates&countryCode=GB#map=56.18531,-3.07274|12|4&bd=useful_information&loc=GB:56.19262:-3.05488:14|windygates|Windygates,%20Leven,%20Fife,%20Scotland,%20KY8%205

http://tinyurl.com/yaqwlny

I had a good friend who used to live in Windygates. Since I'm not a
drinker I just never paid attention. There was a distillery near a
friend's in Kirkcaldy, but I'll be darned if I could tell you the
name.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/4566430.stm
"But, increasingly, Scotland's traditional distilling skills are being
used to produce other spirits.

These include some more usually linked with England, with 80% of the
UK's gin and vodka being produced in Scotland.

Pimms, a classic English summer drink, is actually distilled in Fife.

Rum also comes off Scottish production lines and Malibu is made near
Kirkcaldy rather than the Caribbean."
The Phantom Piper
2009-12-14 08:56:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fifeshire Floozie
Rum also comes off Scottish production lines and
Malibu is made near Kirkcaldy rather than the Caribbean."
Ah, but for the best Rum it has to be Cuban;
difficult to get in the States due to the silly
Embargo... Failing that Puerto Rican will do,
but I won't say 'no' to something special from
Jamaica or the Virgin Islands, either!


Making Dark'n'Stormies,

The Phantom Piper
Fifeshire Floozie
2009-12-14 07:11:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Custos Custodum
AFAIAA, the Cameron Brig distillery at Windygates is the sole
source
Post by Custos Custodum
of Gordon's gin, allegedly the world's biggest seller.
Now I've heard everything! I just found this ...

http://www.bestfavours.co.uk/

Wedding Favours Personalised Alcohol Miniatures

"Instead of giving your wedding guests traditional sugar almonds , a
great wedding favour idea is to give them a 5cl alcohol miniature with
your own personalised label as a gift and special memento of your
wedding day. Choose from the standard designs or you can have on the
custom design label a graphic or photo of your choice, you could for
example have a picture of where you are getting married, your zodiac
signs, your family name crest, or Scottish clan crest, your own
photographs , or you can personalise the bottle label in any way you
like - your own novel ideas for the design are welcome !"

'You can get a caricature made from your own photographs. You can
choose your own theme for the caricature. The drawing can then be used
on the labels for your miniatures.
The caricature drawing is also a great memento of your wedding and
could also be used on your stationery."
Ejaycee
2009-12-14 11:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article6952266.ece
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that in
company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins from where
we once lived

http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd

Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property

Ejay
Mike MacKinnon
2009-12-14 15:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ejaycee
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/articl...
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that in
company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins from where
we once lived
http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd
Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property
Ejay
There's even an Indian single malt and quite good it is too!

Mike
Cory Bhreckan
2009-12-14 16:24:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike MacKinnon
Post by Ejaycee
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/articl...
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that in
company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins from where
we once lived
http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd
Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property
Ejay
There's even an Indian single malt and quite good it is too!
Mike
Made with real Indians?
--
"For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed." - William Topaz McGonagall
La N
2009-12-14 17:27:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cory Bhreckan
Post by Mike MacKinnon
Post by Ejaycee
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/articl...
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that
in company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins
from where we once lived
http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd
Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property
Ejay
There's even an Indian single malt and quite good it is too!
Mike
Made with real Indians?
Safe to serve at pow wows?
Cory Bhreckan
2009-12-14 20:20:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
Post by Cory Bhreckan
Post by Mike MacKinnon
Post by Ejaycee
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/articl...
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year wait
Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that
in company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins
from where we once lived
http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd
Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property
Ejay
There's even an Indian single malt and quite good it is too!
Mike
Made with real Indians?
Safe to serve at pow wows?
They put the pow in pow wow.
--
"For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed." - William Topaz McGonagall
La N
2009-12-14 22:45:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cory Bhreckan
Post by La N
Post by Cory Bhreckan
Post by Mike MacKinnon
Post by Ejaycee
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/articl...
A double English? Right away - with apologies for the 100-year
wait Valentine Low
The English whisky has been matured in oak casks for three years
Whisky, as the world knows, is Scottish. If it's not Scottish it's Irish, in
which case they spell it "whiskey", or American, in which case they spell it
"bourbon". At a push it is Japanese, but best not to mention that
in company.
snip<
They are now producing a single malt whisky inTasmania not 2 mins
from where we once lived
http://tinyurl.com/y8cjtwd
Its amazing what they can do with a run down historic property
Ejay
There's even an Indian single malt and quite good it is too!
Mike
Made with real Indians?
Safe to serve at pow wows?
They put the pow in pow wow.
Wow, dude.

- nil
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